We are so excited to announce that the new Posto9 collection has just hit the studio. 

Posto9 combines innovative activewear with Brazilian fabrics, inspired by the relaxed vibe of Ipanema Beach in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Perfect for the modern woman.

Using deluxe quality Brazilian Lycra® in vivid colours and tropical prints all products are moisture-wicking, dry-fit, colourfast, UV-proof, and feel like a second skin. 

Posto9 also make their own patterns and designs and do not resell ready-made products from Brazil. (Who wants to look like everybody else anyway?) All the unique designs are created in London and ethically produced by a local collective in Rio de Janeiro.

Posto9-collection

Company Ethics:

We often get asked, why do we produce in Brazil? The answer is, we are providing jobs in the local community, as well as helping the street children via regular donations to Task Brasil.

All our clothing is ethically produced in Brazil by a women from low-income neighbourhoods in Zona Norte, Zona Oeste, and São Gonçalo, Rio de Janeiro. Some even have sewing machines set up in their living room.

By enabling them to work from home, we help them to become independent while supporting their families. So when you buy Posto9 products, you are contributing to a socially-aware and responsible production line.

5% of all Posto9 sales are donated monthly to improve the lives of the street children of Rio de Janeiro.

Task Brasil Inc. is a US non-profit organisation set up to support Task Brasil in the UK with its projects for children and teenagers at risk and from the streets.

Task Brasil started running residential care for street children and young people in 1998 after receiving a very generous donation from Jimmy Page, the Led Zeppelin rock icon, who witnessed first hand the deprivation of the children and troubles in the favelas whilst playing in Rio de Janeiro. The money donated was used towards buying a house on a plot of land in Santa Teresa, a district of Rio de Janeiro. ‘Casa Jimmy’ has provided a safe and happy home for 500 young children and pregnant teenage girls who were either living on the streets, or leading lives of great deprivation and vulnerability.

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